Dr. Hannah Allen: babylon Health

Dr Hannah Allen is the Associate Medical Director of Babylon Health, a service that provides remote consultations with health care professionals via text and video messaging on their mobile app. She currently works as a GP, and is passionate about improving the healthcare industry through innovation in new technologies, in particular, female health via “Femtech” to improve antenatal and postnatal mental health. She graduated in 2008 from the University of Warwick after initially completing a degree in BioMedical Sciences from Newcastle University. Here she talks about life as an “online doctor”, and why she is such a vocal advocate for…

Smartphones and Opthalmology

Dr Chrishan Gunasekera graduated from UCL Medical School in 2011. He is now an ophthalmologist involved in developing ways to use smartphones in eye examination and microsurgical training as well as an Honorary Senior Clinical Teaching Fellow at UCL. Here he shares with us his journey since graduating from UCLMS, and evaluates the medical technology he is currently working on. RR: Can you talk us through your career progression and your current role? CG: After finishing medical school, I completed my foundation training in London. I took a year out following FY2 and was a Clinical Teaching Fellow for the…

Talking mindfulness

An interview with James Groves, final year medical student at UCL and co-founder of Mindful medics. Here he delves into what mindfulness is and the many benefits of making it a part of your life! When was it that you originally became interested in mindfulness? We all know the stressful environment that medical school can foster… Well, it was experiencing this stress in my first year which essentially led me to start practicing mindfulness. I’m someone who has always been quite introspective and analytical. In particular, I’ve always found myself looking for the “best strategy” when doing anything: the best…

Drugs, Sex & Gender: Why One Prescription Doesn’t Fit All

Issy Good explores how sex can be overlooked in science and what the subsequent consequences might be.   Researchers have recently explored and identified the different ways that men and women react to drugs. However, little consideration is taken regarding sex when it comes down to prescribing drugs and treatment course, and this extends to prescription education. Increasing evidence is coming to light indicating a sex-based discrepancy in the efficacy of pharmaceuticals.This can be traced to historical, social and biological problems with the medical models currently used. Instances include the 2013 warnings issued by the Federal Drugs Agency (FDA) regarding…